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Boise student heads to Washington as Intel Science Talent Search finalist

Nate Marshall (right) and Karthik Mouli competed with the Boise High School team on March 7 at the Micron Science Bowl in Boise. Nate Marshall

Nate Marshall (right) and Karthik Mouli competed with the Boise High School team on March 7 at the Western Idaho High School Science Bowl in Boise. Boise High came in second in the competition, after Treasure Valley Math & Science Center. Marshall is headed to Washington, D.C. for the Intel Science Talent Search March 10-16. He’s one of 40 finalists in the prestigious competition from around the country. Photo by Celia Southcombe.

Boise High School senior Nate Marshall, 17, is headed to Washington, D.C. March 10 for the Intel Science Talent Search, the nation’s best-known science and math competition for students who have not yet entered college.

Marshall is one of 40 finalists chosen in January from around the United States to compete March 10-16 for more than $1 million in Intel Foundation awards. Three students will win first-place awards of  $150,000 for showing exceptional scientific potential in the areas of basic research, global good and innovation. There will also be three second-place awards of $75,000 and three third-place awards of $35,000. All finalists receive at least $7,500 for being selected.

Marshall grew up in Boise and attended Adams and Roosevelt elementary schools, the Treasure Valley Math and Science Center, and North Junior High, said his father John Marshall, a Boise lawyer.

Nate Marshall created his project last summer at a science internship for high school students at the University of California at Santa Cruz, his father said.  It’s called Rapid Climate Change in the Prehistoric Greenhouse World: A Foreshadowing of our Future?

The 75-year-old Science Talent Search attracts top performers who are selected not only for their science acumen but for their leadership capacity and their initiative. Previous finalists have won eight Nobel Prizes, three National Medals of Science, two Fields Medals (essentially the equivalent of a Nobel for math) and 12 MacArthur Foundation “genius grants.”

 

 

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