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City of Boise opens Boise WaterShed river campus

City Council members Maryanne Jordan (left, in green) and Elaine Clegg (with scissors) cut the ribbon at the grand opening of the RiverShed project with students from Boise's Montessori Academy on April 12 in Boise. Photo by Otto Kitsinger and courtesy of the city of Boise.

City Council members Maryanne Jordan (left, in green) and Elaine Clegg (with scissors) cut the ribbon at the grand opening of the Boise WaterShed River Campus with students from Boise’s Montessori Academy on April 12 in Boise. Photo by Otto Kitsinger and courtesy of the city of Boise.

Boise Mayor David Bieter was joined by city council, participating artists, and community partners April 12 in opening the newly completed Boise WaterShed River Campus.

The 2-acre complex was designed and planned by a team of artists, engineers, and educators. It tells the story of the Boise River watershed through public art, landscaping, water features and interactive exhibits.  The park-like setting allows visitors to discover water’s many roles in cities and agricultural areas and how citizens can protect and conserve these resources for the future.

The public art was completed by 14 local artists and tells the story of the Boise River, from the headwaters in high mountain streams, to Lucky Peak Reservoir, flowing through Boise and downstream

Designer Byron Folwell discusses his piece Fluxion at the River Campus grand opening at the Boise Watershed April 12 in Boise. Photo by Otto Kitsinger and courtesy of the city of Boise.

Designer Byron Folwell discusses his piece Fluxion at the River Campus grand opening at the Boise Watershed April 12 in Boise. Photo by Otto Kitsinger and courtesy of the city of Boise.

communities, before eventually joining the Snake River.

“The Boise River is an integral part of who we are as a community – it’s one of the things that makes Boise so special,” said Bieter.  “By educating future generations on the vital importance of our water, we can help give our community a view of just how important this precious resource is to our community and its sense of itself.”

Located at the West Boise Water Renewal Facility (formerly referred to as the Wastewater Treatment Facility), the $3.1 million dollar project was funded by the City of Boise’s Department of Public Works, Department of Arts & History and the Percent for Art Program, and Boise WaterShed Exhibits, Inc.  Programming includes free tours and hands-on education. In 2016, the Boise Watershed provided education to nearly 23,000 Treasure Valley residents, many of them school-aged children.

The Boise WaterShed River Campus and Education Center is open to the public April 15 from 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. for a free event with games, food and guided tours.

 

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