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Idaho National Laboratory awards STEM grants to Idaho schools

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Jared Gee from Sugar-Salem High School will use $4,949.57 in grant money to update the Sugar Salem High School science lab for chemistry and biology. Photo courtesy of INL.

Idaho National Laboratory Two has awarded two eastern Idaho schools STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) grants to enhance and supplement their STEM learning. In addition, four Extreme Classroom Makeover grants worth up to $5,000 were awarded in southeastern Idaho. Statewide, 19 STEM Mini grants worth up to $500 were awarded.

Teachers and principals from public and private schools throughout the state apply each year for INL STEM grants, which are awarded based on the educator’s plan, idea or classroom needs to bolster STEM education. The money can be used to purchase equipment and materials for classrooms.

“Too often, educators and administrators are not aware of the funding opportunities available in their own backyard,” said Amy Lientz, INL’s director of Partnerships, Engagement and Technology Deployment. “This type of funding allows for furthering student interest in STEM careers and helps to grow our talent pipeline, enabling a sustainable future workforce.”

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Kristoffer Smith from Longfellow Elementary School was awarded $9,987.07 to create a Makers Space for STEM at the school. Photo courtesy of the INL.

Ultimate STEM Grant recipients:

Chase Crook from Rigby Middle school, $10,000, will use the money to purchase life science materials for the classroom.

Kristoffer Smith from Longfellow Elementary School, $9,987.07, will use the money to create a Makers Space for STEM at the school.

Classroom Makeover Grant recipients:

Jared Gee from Sugar-Salem High School, $4,949.57, will use the money to reimage the Sugar-Salem High School science lab for chemistry and biology.

Troy Easterday from Castleford School District 417, $5,000, will use the money to purchase materials to teach energy efficiency in rural towns.

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Chase Crook from Rigby Middle school will use $10,000 in grant money to purchase life science materials for the classroom. Photo courtesy of INL.

Heidi McJunkin from Snake River Montessori School, $1,046, will use the money to purchase a classroom set of computer coding curriculum.

Leslie Woodford from Pocatello Valley Montessori School, $1,000, will use the money to purchase a classroom set of complex math manipulatives to teach STEM.

 

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