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Boise a good place for Baby Boomers, says study

Boise comes in at second place on a ranking of the best cities for baby boomers in the United States.

An Austin-based storage company called SpareFoot used data on population growth, per-capita GDP growth, per-capita income growth, housing affordability and the number of health workers per capita to come up with its ranking.

San Antonio, Texas, came in first on SpareFoot’s list for its diversity and proximity to the beach. But Boise was second on SpareFoot’s Top Ten list. The company praised its recreation options and Basque culture. SpareFoot said Boise’s Baby Boomer population has grown nearly 12 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Third on the list was Raleigh, N.C.

IBR Staff

IDL to hold voluntary cabin site auctions

The Department of Lands aims to auction 90 or more of its lakefront cabin sites in central and northern Idaho in 2014, part of its plan to divest itself of the lucrative but difficult-to-manage assets.

The State Board of Land Commissioners Dec. 17 approved holding voluntary auctions of 74 cottage sites at Priest Lake and 21 cottages at Payette Lake.

The Department of Land, which manages more than 500 of these cabin sites on the two lakes, had tried to dispose of the property through a land exchange earlier this year.

But the Land Board, which includes Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, rejected that move.

As a consequence, this auction is slated for late February or early March.

The auctions will include just land.

Successful bidders must pay market price for cabins.

The Associated Press

Idahoans Had More After-Tax Money in 2012

A new study shows the amount of after-tax money available to Idahoans to buy food, clothing, housing and luxury items increased by 3.2 percent in 2012.

The Idaho Department of Labor also reports the buying power of Hispanics jumped 5.9 percent in 2012 compared to the previous year. That increase marks the slowest growth rate for the state’s Hispanic population since the depths of the recession in 2009. The agency’s report is based on estimates prepared by the Selig Center for Economic Growth at the University of Georgia.

Buying power is the after-tax personal income spent on necessities to luxuries like recreational equipment and vacations. Figures show the Hispanic influence on Idaho’s economy ranks 14th among states, trailing New Mexico where Hispanics account for 32 percent of total buying power.

The Associated Press

EMSI study says Provo-Orem area has some of the best jobs

The San Francisco area, the Provo-Orem area in Utah, and metro areas in the U.S. South are the best places to find work, according to the Moscow-based Economic Modeling Specialists International.

EMSI released its 2013 research on the best large cities with the best jobs on Dec. 13. It studied the 100 most populous areas in the United States.

The northern Idaho think tank says the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont economy has done well in the last few years in tech and finance. It’s also a good place for interpreters & translators.

The Provo-Orem area has a strong labor market, especially in the tech center, EMSI said. Provo has added the seventh-most jobs per capita since 2010.

And metro areas in the South, like Greenville-Mauldin-Easley in South Carolina, and Charleston-North Charleston-Summerville, also in South Carolina, also are good areas.

IBR Staff

Idaho unemployment rate falls to 6.1 percent

Idaho’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell by a record sixth-tenths of a percentage point to 6.1 percent in November.

The state Labor Department said Dec. 20 the rate matches the post-recession low posted last spring and the decline is double the previous record one-month swing of three-tenths of a percentage point.

The agency says about 3,800 more Idahoans were at work in November, with total unemployment dropping to 47,300, the lowest level since last spring.

In November 2012, Idaho’s unemployment rate was 6.5 percent with over 50,000 people out of work.

State officials note that the Bureau of Labor Statistics will adjust the 2013 monthly unemployment rates early next year using more updated statistical information, which could revise the October-to-November decline.

The Associated Press

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