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Coyote Design expands to larger quarters on Curtis Road

Dale Perkins (left) and Matt Perkins, CEO and president of Coyote Design and Rehab Systems, in their production facility on Lemhi Street in Boise in April. The company moves May 1 to a building on Curtis Road. Photo by Patrick Sweeney.

Dale Perkins (left) and Matt Perkins, CEO and president of Coyote Design and Rehab Systems, in their production facility on Lemhi Street in Boise in April. The company is moving June 1 to a building on Curtis Road. Photo by Patrick Sweeney.

Coyote Design and Rehab Systems, a Boise company that makes parts for prosthetics, is expanding and moving into larger space on Curtis Road.

Coyote researches and designs components at its 6,000-square-foot plant on Cole Road. It ships the parts around the U.S., and has distributors in 12 countries, said its president and CEO, Matt Perkins. Through its Rehab Systems division, the company also operates patient care offices in Twin Falls and in Boise where customers are fitted for prosthetics.

The company, which was founded in 1999 and employs 19 people, is moving June 1 to a 10,000-square-foot building at 427 N. Curtis Road and putting the building it occupies now up for sale or lease. The architect on the new site is Rob Thornton, and the contractor is Andy Peterson with Level Construction.

Perkins is a former ski racer and triathlete who competed in the 1998 Paralympic Games in Nagano, Japan.

Coyote Design carries out design work, testing, and prototyping of components, and assembles the prosthetic devices to be delivered to the patient.It’s one of a few prosthetic companies in the Treasure Valley. It contracts out most of its manufacturing to local injection molders, machinists, and others. Much of its work is done at Boise State’s Tech Help, Perkins said.

“About 90 percent of what we create is manufactured within about 20 miles of this office,” he said.

Coyote Design has grown every year for 15 years on its manufacturing side, Perkins said. He expects the company to continue growing through new product development, and has recently started bringing in more of its engineering and design work in-house from Tech Help. Coyote Design has also added equipment for manufacturing components in small quantities, and Perkins said he thinks 3-D printing will eventually be key to the manufacturer of prosthetics.

“We’re increasing our design capabilities,” he said. “We can essentially fail faster when we’re trying new devices, new products, so that we can get to the successful ones more affordably.”

Perkins’ father, Dale, is also in the prosthetics business. He helped create a prosthetic foot that climber Tom Whittaker used as the first amputee to summit Mount Everest in 1998, and he started Rehab Systems.

Mostly, Perkins said, the company sticks to helping regular people, not championship athletes.

“Our interest is actually more the other direction, in making sure everybody can do what they want to do,” Perkins said. “For the person who wasn’t able to go to the store on their own for six months or a year, or more, when they can finally get back to independence, that’s as big a deal as someone running a marathon.”

Coyote Designs is small compared to its counterparts in other states, and Perkins said he said he expects it to stay that way.

“We’re going to have a lot more fun being a very small, nimble, closely-knit company than a giant building full of strangers,” he said.

About Anne Wallace Allen

Anne Wallace Allen is the editor of the Idaho Business Review.