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New Boise architectural firm busy with affordable housing, education projects

John King, a principal at Pivot North Architecture works on a drawing Wednesday, April 5, 2016 in Boise.

John King, a principal at Pivot North Architecture in Boise, works on a drawing April 5. Photo by Glenn Landberg.

A pair of architects who had worked at the Hummel Architects office in Boise together have started a firm with a third partner in a former liquor store in downtown Boise.

Clint Sievers and John King started Pivot North Architecture in September and teamed up with Gary Sorensen, and have hired five people since then.

The firm was recently selected as the top finalist in the Ash Street project a set of 30 townhomes with retail on a .71-acre parcel across from Payette Brewing in downtown Boise. Boise’s Capital City Development Corp., which put out the RFP for the $7 million project, requires that the apartments be affordable for individuals and families earning between 80 and 140 percent of the local average median. Pivot North will work on the project with GGLO Design of Seattle, which also designed The Afton apartment building that is under construction in downtown Boise.

Clint Sievers, a principal at Pivot North Architecture works from his desk Wednesday, April 5, 2016 in Boise.

Clint Sievers, a principal at Pivot North Architecture works from his desk April 5 in Boise. Photo by Glenn Landberg.

Pivot North is also the finalist to design a Living Learning complex at Lewis Clark State College in Lewiston, student housing that includes academic programming space. And Sievers was selected as architect for the Filer School District in southern Idaho, and the firm will be helping with the strategic planning and programming for the school district’s next bond election.

“We’re going to help them develop a master plan that will include engaging the community to learn how the community wants to move forward with their school district planning,” Sievers said.

The firm’s key sectors are education, healthcare, civic and private projects such as retail, multi-family and single-family residential design.

The firm chose an open plan for its new downtown office, and Sievers said the three principals are seeking a culture of personal and professional growth, where newer architects are mentored.

“It starts with our culture, both from a client base and for the employees,” said Sievers. “It’s a collaborative work environment, and when you have closed offices, a lot of things happen in a silo.”

 

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