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Created in Poland, 1914 log home is now for sale in Idaho

THe home

This white pine log home in Careywood was originally built in Poland in 1914 and was shipped to Idaho in 1998. It’s for sale for $175,000. All photos courtesy of Century 21 Beutler & Associates.

A home that was built in the Carpathian Mountains of Poland in 1914, dismantled when the Nazis came through, rebuilt, and then moved to Idaho is for sale in Careywood for $175,000.

The 1,400-square-foot mountaintop home has a view of Lake Pend Oreille and antique copper roof, said owner Mary Alderete, whose husband, Derk Klein, found the home and had it dismantled and shipped to northern Idaho for a local buyer.

The house includes German-style stained glass windows, says owner Mary Alderete.

The house includes German-style stained glass windows, says owner Mary Alderete.

The home is an example of a distinct architectural style popular in Zakopane, a town in the northern foothills of Poland’s Tatra Mountains. The Tatras are the highest range in the Carpathians and a natural border between Slovakia and Poland. Alderete, who has researched the style, provided materials showing that the area was a health resort and region with a distinct style, language and dress in the late 19th century. A Warsaw artist and art critic named Stanisław Witkiewicz identified the style of home in that region, saying it held the roots of a Polish national style, and a group of architects eventually constructed many more homes in that style in the early 20th century.

The house was moved from the Carpathian Mountain range in Poland to a northern Idaho mountaintop overlooking Lake Ponderay.

The house was moved from the Carpathian Mountain range in Poland to a northern Idaho mountaintop overlooking Lake Pend Oreille.

The Careywood home is an example of one such building. Alderete said the home was taken apart and stored when the Nazis came through in 1942 and was rebuilt in 1946.

She said a local woman asked Klein, an antiques dealer, to obtain the home for her, although by the time he had shipped it to Idaho in 1998 and hired a crew of Canadian log home builders to reconstruct it, the buyer had lost interest in the project. It has never been occupied.

“She never came to look at it,” said Alderete. “She was just an eccentric woman.”

Alderete and Klein bought the home back about a decade ago, and now hope to find a buyer who will rehabilitate it. The structure is little more than a shell of white pine logs and boards in some places, though Alderete noted the property does include an unusual copper tile roof and German-style stained glass windows. It comes with 10 acres that includes a cedar forest and springs.

“We thought about trying to rebuild it, but it’s just too much for us,” she said. She has listed it with Century 21 Beutler & Associates and said she’s had some interested buyers.

“It’s so sad. It’s extremely unique and it’s beautiful,” Alderete said.

 

Watch IBR’s segment on KTVB Friday’s at 4 p.m. On Oct. 27, IBR Editor Anne Wallace Allen discussed this topic with KTVB’s Doug Petcash. Click here to watch the video.

About Anne Wallace Allen

Anne Wallace Allen is the editor of the Idaho Business Review.

4 comments

  1. It needs to be moved to New England

  2. Great story except that according to Polish news this house was STOLEN by the Germans during WWII: //wiadomosci.onet.pl/swiat/niemcy-skradli-zabytkowy-dom-w-stylu-zakopianskim-z-1914-r-odnalazl-sie-w-usa/56q94zn

  3. I am from Poland and I do not hide that I am amazed by this story. A real Polish highlander home in the USA, very nice :)