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Anthony Shallat, 2019 Leaders in Law

Advocacy, entrepreneurship and preservation

At the junction of history, technology and community advancement

 

Anthony Shallat profile

Attorney Anthony Shallat works in both historic preservation and cutting-edge technology in Boise. Photo by Pete Grady.

Anthony Shallat started his career in politics, but soon moved to civil rights and white collar fraud litigation with Angstman Johnson before joining Fisher Hudson in downtown Boise in 2019.

Today, he is focused on being a local entrepreneur and on advocating for his clients. By all measures, he’s thriving on both fronts.

Shallat first made his mark on Boise with a lawsuit against Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), which has since rebranded itself as CoreCivic. He represented inmates who had been injured in a brutal gang stabbing at the company’s private prison.

During discovery, he explains, he found significant corporate and white collar fraud. At trial, a jury found that his clients’ rights had indeed been violated.

At Fisher Hudson, Shallat is growing his stable of clients while building up the firm’s brand through marketing efforts, which he volunteered to deploy himself.

He has represented a beer distributor, a publicly traded company, local real estate investors, homeowners involved in real estate disputes and even an e-scooter company.

2019 Leaders in Law magazine

Click here to read the full 2019 Leaders in Law magazine.

Shallat, who is known for his propensity to dive deeply into new topics on a regular basis, has also become an expert in technology law. Last year, he organized the Idaho Bar’s first-ever continuing education course focused on cryptocurrency law. He also represents local cryptocurrencies and regularly writes about new developments in the field on his firm’s blog.

He’s fairly new to Fisher Hudson, but Shallat has already found friends and earned respect among his colleagues.

“I think he’ll be one of the long-term leaders there, and we all are really grateful that he joined our firm,” says Clare Thibeau, who worked with him when he first joined and has since become the founder of Impresaria, a business consulting firm.

“He has an energy about him that I really enjoy — it’s fun to be around him,” Thibeau says. “It feels like he’s taking care of business in a great way.”

Off the clock, Shallat focuses on historic and environmental preservation. He is the founder of Keep Idaho Public, which uses proceeds from apparel sales to benefit public lands. He also serves on the Boise Historic Preservation Commission, where he has worked to save a number of historic homes in the East Main Historic District from demolition.

He calls his work with technology, on one hand, and with preservation, on the other, an interesting juxtaposition. But it’s one he hopes will serve Boise well now and into the future.

“I see some potential challenges with all the population growth coming in here and I feel like I have the opportunity to bridge the divide between historic, old Boise and 2020 Boise, and helping our communities co-exist,” he says.

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