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Good Works

Holland & Hart associate Patrick McNulty helps install a fence at the Summerwind School of Math & Science’s Garden of Learning in Boise. Photo courtesy of Holland & Hart.

Holland & Hart helps prepare school learning garden

The Holland & Hart Foundation helped the Summerwind School of Math & Science in Boise prepare its Garden of Learning for the growing season.

Five Holland & Hart employees and their families (13 volunteers altogether) helped weed garden boxes and build a new fence. The work took about two and a half hours. Earlier this year the foundation awarded a $2,000 matching-funds grant to the school in support of the garden.

The school will incorporate the garden into the teaching curriculum. The school will also plant climbing plants on the fence to create a “living” fence for the children to study.

P.F. Chang’s raises money for cancer foundation

On April 29, P.F. Chang’s China Bistro collected money for the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and hosted a registration booth where racers could sign up for the Boise Race for the Cure.

Customers who dined at P.F. Chang’s April 29 had the option to donate 20 percent of their tabs to the Susan G. Komen Idaho Affiliate. The staff also donated 20 percent of all gratuities to the foundation.

P.F. Chang’s Pink Ninja Warrior Race Team ran during Race for the Cure May 11. The team helped people sign up for the race April 29 and handed out free gifts to people who dined in at P.F. Chang’s.

Children at Morley Nelson Community Center’s after-school program read books provided by donations from the Boise Southwest Rotary Club and the Idaho Commission for Libraries. Photo courtesy of Boise Parks & Recreation.

Donations provide books to after-school program

The Boise Southwest Rotary Club and the Idaho Commission for Libraries made donations that brought new books to the after-school program at Morley Nelson Community Center.

The Rotary Club donated $500 for the purchase of reading materials. The Commission for Libraries contributed 200 new books.

The Morley Nelson Community Center provides free after-school and drop-in summer programs for about 80 low-income children per day in grades one through 12.

Koko FitClub donates to American Cancer Society

Koko FitClub members in Meridian and Idaho Falls worked out to raise money for the American Cancer Society May 4 and 5.

Members who did a cardio workout for 15 minutes racked up 500 “Koko points” toward a goal of 5 million points nationwide. The club in Meridian and the two clubs in Idaho Falls earned just less than 200,000 points (that’s just less than 100 hours of cardio workouts).

Nationwide, gym members fell short of the goal, but did accumulate more than 4.2 million points, for which the club donated $10,000 to the ACS.

Meridian Dutch Bros. Coffee employees wear shirts bearing the “Drink One for Dane” logo during MDA Day May 3. The Meridian locations raised $5,812 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. Photo courtesy of Dutch Bros.

Dutch Bros. raises money for Muscular Dystrophy Association

On May 3, Treasure Valley Dutch Bros. Coffee locations recognized MDA Day and donated all proceeds to the Muscular Dystrophy Association, the world leader in fighting amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The event is held annually in honor of company co-founder Dane Boersma, who was diagnosed with ALS in 2005 and died in 2009. During the event, employees and their families and friends display the “Drink One for Dane” slogan. There is no cure for ALS.

The Meridian Dutch Bros. locations raised $5,812. The Boise and Garden City locations raised $9,838.50. The remaining Treasure Valley locations’ totals were not available at press time.

Idaho farmers help MillerCoors earn recognition for water conservation

MillerCoors earned a U.S. Water Prize from the U.S. Water Alliance for reducing its water usage.

Idaho Silver Creek barley farmers and The Nature Conservancy were partners in the water reduction efforts, which cover the brewing process from barley growth to beer production. Silver Creek Valley was able to reduce its water use by 20 percent.

Dr. Carrie Breaux examines Troll, a dog who works with Staff Sgt. Robert Wilson to find explosive devices in Afghanistan. Photo courtesy of WestVet.

WestVet provides free eye exams for service dogs

Carrie Breaux, a veterinarian at WestVet 24-Hour Animal Emergency & Specialty Center, is offering free eye exams during the month of May for service dogs.

Breaux will look for redness, squinting, cloudy corneas, retinal disease, early cataracts and other serious abnormalities. Early detection and treatment are essential to keeping the animals’ eyes in prime condition.

The event is part of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists/Merial National Service Dog Eye Exam Event. Since 2008, nearly 16,000 service animals have been examined.

Boise organizations help celebrate Mothers Day at nursing homes

Volunteer youth groups from Hope Lutheran Church and the Boise High Family, Career & Community Leaders of America Club distributed flowers to mothers at the Boise Village, the Idaho State Veterans Home and the Marquis, as well as participants of the Meals on Wheels program May 8.

The Idaho Health Care Association-Idaho Center for Assisted Living coordinated the effort in cooperation with the Boise Downtown Rotary Club, who donated the flowers. The Good Samaritan Society-Boise Village oversaw the preparation of the flower arrangements.

Children grab the tails of steelhead Idaho Power donated to the Jerome Food Ministry with Martha & Mary’s Food Pantry. Photo courtesy of Idaho Power.

Idaho Power provides surplus steelhead to food banks

Idaho Power, along with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, raises about 1.8 million steelhead each year to be released into the Snake, Salmon and Pahsimeroi rivers. Excess brood stock from the fish hatchery goes to food banks to help people in need.

More than 630 fish went to the Jerome Food Ministry with Martha & Mary’s Food Pantry in Jerome. Volunteers filleted enough fish to provide about 3,200 meals. Some of the fish parts that weren’t used for food went into the community garden as fertilizer.

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